Music Chords Theory

Chord theory, structure and progressions

We look at the definition of a music chord, the different types of music chords, and the intervals used to make up these chords.

Music chord

Music chords are made up of 2 or more notes played in succession. The most commonly played chords are 3-note chords which are also called triads. They can be extended by adding more notes forming 7th's, 9th's, 11th's and 13th's.

Music Chords Theory: We will be looking at music chords, chord structure, and chord progressions. Each section includes comprehensive music charts which are free to download making for very handy reference material. Here's what you'll find...

You will find a brief summary of each category below with links that will take you to comprehensive pages relating to each topic.

Music Chords

  • what is a music chord?
  • the most common music chords?
  • intervals and the concept of stacking 3rds - minor 3rd's and major 3rd's
  • how stacking thirds creates major, minor, augmented and diminished triads
  • what is a music chord composed of?
  • what are the names of music notes and chords?
  • Music Charts: triads, intervals, chord symbols and notes...free download
  • Music Charts: 7th chords or 4 note chords, intervals, chord symbols and notes...free download
  • Music Charts: extended chords including 9th, 11th and 13th chords, intervals, chord symbols and notes...free download
  • what is a suspended chord?... more on music chords

Chord Structure

  • what does chord structure consist of?
  • what are the symbols associated with chord types?
  • Music Charts: all the different types of chords, chord symbols and chord formulas which equate to notes in the scale...free download
  • the importance of knowing and understanding your chord formulas... more on chord structure

Chord Progressions

  • what is a chord progression?
  • basic chord progressions
  • 3-chord progressions
  • 12-bar blues
  • Music Charts: chord progressions for all major and minor keys...free download
  • the meaning of enharmonic?
  • adding interest to your chord progressions...more on chord progressions
In closing...

If you understand intervals, you are well on your way to understanding music chords theory. If you know your chord formulas, you can work out any chord and play it in a multitude of different positions on any instrument that enables you to play chords, such as piano, keyboards, guitar etc.

Download all the available charts, stick them on your wall and use them whenever the need arises. You will find yourself referring to them time and time again. The more you refer to them, the more you will remember them. The more you remember them, the easier the chords become.

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